-  Wednesday 23 October 2019
     

    France's rebels

    FRIDAY, APRIL 7, 2006
    Regarding the article "French protesters set fresh deadline" (April 6): Many more people than you can imagine are fed up with the "strikers" and all the French citizens who are only interested in becoming civil servants. Many French people do not share the opinion of the students, civil servants and unions, whose ideas are damaging to employment.
     
    There is a huge effort by the unions, the Socialists and the Communists to prevent the government of Prime Minister Dominique de Villepin from finding solutions to unemployment, so as to improve the chances of the left in next year's elections.
     
    Gilles Laurencot, Besançon, France
     
     
    When I was in law school four years ago, there was a general consensus there that the European Union would emerge as a primary competitor to the United States in all areas. There were, of course, a few detractors of the European Union.
     
    Europe's critics argued that the EU would never succeed because it would never make the sacrifices necessary to form a truly competitive economic block. They said that Europe will never accept the short-term pain that will inevitably result from a loosening of their tightly regulated labor markets.
     
    Back then this was the minority opinion. Not now. The EU critics appear to have been prescient.
     
    If France, a primary economic engine of the EU, cannot accept a minor alteration to their absurd labor-market restrictions, then what future does the EU have as a competitor?
     
    Mark Leinauer, St. Louis, Missouri
     
     
    America has been roundly criticized for being behind Europe on social issues, but the evidence is now clear: Europe has gone too far.
     
    It is not possible for Europeans to maintain their protected lifestyle. They have to compete on the world stage and to do so they cannot work fewer hours, keep unproductive workers in positions for life and provide more benefits than competitors.
     
    Jim Gammon Manasquan, New Jersey
     
     
    What are French protesters really agitating for? The right to be rewarded for sloth? In a country that has a 35-hour workweek and offers workers more than a month of vacation each year, the French inexplicably wonder why economic growth is sluggish. Instead of working or studying, they think throwing bottles at the police is a better use of their time.
     
    At least most of those protesting the new employment contract have a chance at getting a job. The rage of the mostly Muslim rioters late last year was at least somewhat understandable (although still unacceptable). These were youths who could rightly claim discrimination in a culture that barely acknowledges their existence - let alone their plight. Now, though, what we see is the tantrum of an insecure and arrogant generation.
     
    Jeremy S. Slavin, Jerusalem
     
     
    The EU blanket
     
    Regarding the article "Mixed message for EU on Balkan expansion" (April 4) about Romania and Bulgaria joining the European Union: The best argument is stability.
     
    By accepting these countries into the Union, Europe will in effect throw a blanket of stability over a large chunk of the Balkans. The package of economic, judicial and administrative reforms that the EU insists on has provided these countries with the strategic direction that their own weak political parties have been unable to provide.
     
    Major projects are going on to secure what will become the EU's second biggest external border and reform is happening in all areas.
     
    My only regret is that this same package is not made available to the rest of the Balkans, an area where strategic direction is essentially missing and security issues are a continual source of problems.
     
    Rupert Wolfe Murray, London
     
     Regarding the article "French protesters set fresh deadline" (April 6): Many more people than you can imagine are fed up with the "strikers" and all the French citizens who are only interested in becoming civil servants. Many French people do not share the opinion of the students, civil servants and unions, whose ideas are damaging to employment.
     
    There is a huge effort by the unions, the Socialists and the Communists to prevent the government of Prime Minister Dominique de Villepin from finding solutions to unemployment, so as to improve the chances of the left in next year's elections.
     
    Gilles Laurencot, Besançon, France
     
     
    When I was in law school four years ago, there was a general consensus there that the European Union would emerge as a primary competitor to the United States in all areas. There were, of course, a few detractors of the European Union.
     
    Europe's critics argued that the EU would never succeed because it would never make the sacrifices necessary to form a truly competitive economic block. They said that Europe will never accept the short-term pain that will inevitably result from a loosening of their tightly regulated labor markets.
     
    Back then this was the minority opinion. Not now. The EU critics appear to have been prescient.
     
    If France, a primary economic engine of the EU, cannot accept a minor alteration to their absurd labor-market restrictions, then what future does the EU have as a competitor?
     
    Mark Leinauer, St. Louis, Missouri
     
     
    America has been roundly criticized for being behind Europe on social issues, but the evidence is now clear: Europe has gone too far.
     
    It is not possible for Europeans to maintain their protected lifestyle. They have to compete on the world stage and to do so they cannot work fewer hours, keep unproductive workers in positions for life and provide more benefits than competitors.
     
    Jim Gammon Manasquan, New Jersey
     
     
    What are French protesters really agitating for? The right to be rewarded for sloth? In a country that has a 35-hour workweek and offers workers more than a month of vacation each year, the French inexplicably wonder why economic growth is sluggish. Instead of working or studying, they think throwing bottles at the police is a better use of their time.
     
    At least most of those protesting the new employment contract have a chance at getting a job. The rage of the mostly Muslim rioters late last year was at least somewhat understandable (although still unacceptable). These were youths who could rightly claim discrimination in a culture that barely acknowledges their existence - let alone their plight. Now, though, what we see is the tantrum of an insecure and arrogant generation.
     
    Jeremy S. Slavin, Jerusalem
     
     
    The EU blanket
     
    Regarding the article "Mixed message for EU on Balkan expansion" (April 4) about Romania and Bulgaria joining the European Union: The best argument is stability.
     
    By accepting these countries into the Union, Europe will in effect throw a blanket of stability over a large chunk of the Balkans. The package of economic, judicial and administrative reforms that the EU insists on has provided these countries with the strategic direction that their own weak political parties have been unable to provide.
     
    Major projects are going on to secure what will become the EU's second biggest external border and reform is happening in all areas.
     
    My only regret is that this same package is not made available to the rest of the Balkans, an area where strategic direction is essentially missing and security issues are a continual source of problems.
     
    Rupert Wolfe Murray, London
     
     Regarding the article "French protesters set fresh deadline" (April 6): Many more people than you can imagine are fed up with the "strikers" and all the French citizens who are only interested in becoming civil servants. Many French people do not share the opinion of the students, civil servants and unions, whose ideas are damaging to employment.
     
    There is a huge effort by the unions, the Socialists and the Communists to prevent the government of Prime Minister Dominique de Villepin from finding solutions to unemployment, so as to improve the chances of the left in next year's elections.
     
    Gilles Laurencot, Besançon, France
     
     
    When I was in law school four years ago, there was a general consensus there that the European Union would emerge as a primary competitor to the United States in all areas. There were, of course, a few detractors of the European Union.
     
    Europe's critics argued that the EU would never succeed because it would never make the sacrifices necessary to form a truly competitive economic block. They said that Europe will never accept the short-term pain that will inevitably result from a loosening of their tightly regulated labor markets.
     
    Back then this was the minority opinion. Not now. The EU critics appear to have been prescient.
     
    If France, a primary economic engine of the EU, cannot accept a minor alteration to their absurd labor-market restrictions, then what future does the EU have as a competitor?
     
    Mark Leinauer, St. Louis, Missouri
     
     
    America has been roundly criticized for being behind Europe on social issues, but the evidence is now clear: Europe has gone too far.
     
    It is not possible for Europeans to maintain their protected lifestyle. They have to compete on the world stage and to do so they cannot work fewer hours, keep unproductive workers in positions for life and provide more benefits than competitors.
     
    Jim Gammon Manasquan, New Jersey
     
     
    What are French protesters really agitating for? The right to be rewarded for sloth? In a country that has a 35-hour workweek and offers workers more than a month of vacation each year, the French inexplicably wonder why economic growth is sluggish. Instead of working or studying, they think throwing bottles at the police is a better use of their time.
     
    At least most of those protesting the new employment contract have a chance at getting a job. The rage of the mostly Muslim rioters late last year was at least somewhat understandable (although still unacceptable). These were youths who could rightly claim discrimination in a culture that barely acknowledges their existence - let alone their plight. Now, though, what we see is the tantrum of an insecure and arrogant generation.
     
    Jeremy S. Slavin, Jerusalem
     
     
    The EU blanket
     
    Regarding the article "Mixed message for EU on Balkan expansion" (April 4) about Romania and Bulgaria joining the European Union: The best argument is stability.
     
    By accepting these countries into the Union, Europe will in effect throw a blanket of stability over a large chunk of the Balkans. The package of economic, judicial and administrative reforms that the EU insists on has provided these countries with the strategic direction that their own weak political parties have been unable to provide.
     
    Major projects are going on to secure what will become the EU's second biggest external border and reform is happening in all areas.
     
    My only regret is that this same package is not made available to the rest of the Balkans, an area where strategic direction is essentially missing and security issues are a continual source of problems.
     
    Rupert Wolfe Murray, London
     
     Regarding the article "French protesters set fresh deadline" (April 6): Many more people than you can imagine are fed up with the "strikers" and all the French citizens who are only interested in becoming civil servants. Many French people do not share the opinion of the students, civil servants and unions, whose ideas are damaging to employment.
     
    There is a huge effort by the unions, the Socialists and the Communists to prevent the government of Prime Minister Dominique de Villepin from finding solutions to unemployment, so as to improve the chances of the left in next year's elections.
     
    Gilles Laurencot, Besançon, France
     
     
    When I was in law school four years ago, there was a general consensus there that the European Union would emerge as a primary competitor to the United States in all areas. There were, of course, a few detractors of the European Union.
     
    Europe's critics argued that the EU would never succeed because it would never make the sacrifices necessary to form a truly competitive economic block. They said that Europe will never accept the short-term pain that will inevitably result from a loosening of their tightly regulated labor markets.
     
    Back then this was the minority opinion. Not now. The EU critics appear to have been prescient.
     
    If France, a primary economic engine of the EU, cannot accept a minor alteration to their absurd labor-market restrictions, then what future does the EU have as a competitor?
     
    Mark Leinauer, St. Louis, Missouri
     
     
    America has been roundly criticized for being behind Europe on social issues, but the evidence is now clear: Europe has gone too far.
     
    It is not possible for Europeans to maintain their protected lifestyle. They have to compete on the world stage and to do so they cannot work fewer hours, keep unproductive workers in positions for life and provide more benefits than competitors.
     
    Jim Gammon Manasquan, New Jersey
     
     
    What are French protesters really agitating for? The right to be rewarded for sloth? In a country that has a 35-hour workweek and offers workers more than a month of vacation each year, the French inexplicably wonder why economic growth is sluggish. Instead of working or studying, they think throwing bottles at the police is a better use of their time.
     
    At least most of those protesting the new employment contract have a chance at getting a job. The rage of the mostly Muslim rioters late last year was at least somewhat understandable (although still unacceptable). These were youths who could rightly claim discrimination in a culture that barely acknowledges their existence - let alone their plight. Now, though, what we see is the tantrum of an insecure and arrogant generation.
     
    Jeremy S. Slavin, Jerusalem
     
     
    The EU blanket
     
    Regarding the article "Mixed message for EU on Balkan expansion" (April 4) about Romania and Bulgaria joining the European Union: The best argument is stability.
     
    By accepting these countries into the Union, Europe will in effect throw a blanket of stability over a large chunk of the Balkans. The package of economic, judicial and administrative reforms that the EU insists on has provided these countries with the strategic direction that their own weak political parties have been unable to provide.
     
    Major projects are going on to secure what will become the EU's second biggest external border and reform is happening in all areas.
     
    My only regret is that this same package is not made available to the rest of the Balkans, an area where strategic direction is essentially missing and security issues are a continual source of problems.
     
    Rupert Wolfe Murray, London
     
     
    Source
    iht




    Leave a Reply

    Name (*)
    e-Mail
    Comment (*)
    Sec Image
    This helps us prevent automated registrations.
    francenepal.info Web Google

    HOME |  |   | NEPAL | SAAR | WORLD | HIMALAYA | TECHNOLOGY | BUSINESS | ART |  RSS
    Copyright © 2006 FRANCE NEPAL, Tous droits réservés , Email : info@nepalfrance.com